Mount Pleasant Wines

Lovedale

A Visionary’s Vineyard

Planted by Maurice O’Shea in 1946, the Lovedale site is a true viticultural marvel. Having been considered completely inhospitable for growing vines, O’Shea recognised this section of sandy ancient sea-bed for its true potential. He saw its suitability for growing exceptional ‘Chablis-style’ wines. Today Lovedale produces some of the most expressive and elegant Semillon in the world.

The Story

1939

Maurice O’Shea purchased the Lovedale site, although he would have to wait 6 years to plant Lovedale as the area was sequestered by the Australian government to be used as a runway during the Second World War.

1946

It was first planted, but it wouldn’t produce a vintage for another 5 years as O’Shea worked tirelessly to overcome the inherent viticultural struggles given the site’s soil type and fertility.

1950

The first vintage of Lovedale was released winning significant success and critical acclaim. It is still enjoyed – bottle matured, up to 19 years later – a true testament to the longevity of the Mount Pleasant style.

1984-1994

It experienced a short hiatus over the 80s as Lovedale fruit was used to satiate demand for bigger volume offerings in the Mount Pleasant portfolio. Despite this, Lovedale forged a special place in the hearts of all who’ve worked with her as a vineyard that even in difficult vintage conditions would shine above the rest. The 1984 and ‘86 vintages were just that and so the winemaking team made Semillon bottlings that went unlabelled until their release 10 years later. For those lucky few who experienced the wine, it was a game changer.

Lovedale Location

Pokolbin, Lower Hunter Valley, NSW

Elevation

60

Size

31.1ha

Varieties

Semillon (22.1ha)
Chardonnay (7.4ha)
Verdelho (1.6ha)

Vine Orientation

Mainly East-West

Vines Per Hectare

2000

Row Spacing

3.35m

Vine Spacing

1.5m

Harvest

January/February

Irrigation

Drip Irrigation

Trellising

Vertical Shoot Positioning and Cordon Ballerina — to ensure maximum sunlight penetration, reduce the risk of disease

Soil Type

Sandy aggregate loam topsoil, with friable red and yellow clay lower root zones